Urine Analysis (Urinalysis)

A urinalysis, or urine test, is a group of tests used to measure and detect several substances in your urine. These include microscopic particles of blood, glucose/ketones (indicative of diabetes), urobilinogen (pointing to liver problems) and protein (indicative of kidney problems).

Urine Analysis (Urinalysis)

Help identify potential kidney and liver problems with your simple to use self-collection urine sample kit.

This test is only available as part of a package.

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Urine Analysis (Urinalysis)

Your urine test involves taking a small urine sample, using our simple collection kit, from the comfort of your own home.  Once you’ve taken and returned the sample, our laboratory will analyse your sample to check the components of your urine.

Some substances found in your urine are to be expected, as they are simply by-products of normal bodily functions.  But blood in the urine could be caused by infection, kidney stones, cystitis or other urinary tract infections, kidney problems and sometimes cancers of the kidney, bladder or prostate.  Your urine test also looks for glucose/ketones (indicative of diabetes), urobilinogen (pointing to liver problems) and protein (indicative of kidney problems).

Doctor Cullimore says “A urine test is a useful way to help identify a range of disorders in their early stages, as substances that are not normally present in urine can be measured and assessed. Some components of urine are just by-products of normal metabolic functions. But others may suggest kidney disease, a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney stones and even certain types of cancer.  If your urine test result comes back as negative for traces of blood but you are experiencing unexplained urinary symptoms such as frequent urination or difficulty passing urine, you should still arrange an appointment to see you GP for further investigation.”

All our tests have been specially designed to be convenient and non-invasive. Once you’ve booked your appointment, full preparation instructions will be provided in your confirmation email or letter. You can continue to eat and drink normally before your appointment, and you’ll also remain fully clothed throughout.

Which readings are included?

The pH level of your urine can be affected by certain diseases, your diet, and the medicines you take. A very acidic (a low pH) or very alkaline (a high pH) result indicates that you have a greater chance of developing kidney stones. If your result is very low or very high, you can usually adjust your diet to reduce the likelihood of developing kidney stones.
Healthy urine will not normally contain protein, as healthy kidneys shouldn’t allow a significant amount of protein to pass through their filters. Whilst small amounts of protein shouldn’t be cause for concern, significant amounts of protein in the urine is called Proteinuria, a condition which can be an indication of kidney damage. Since early-stage kidney disease often presents no physical symptoms, large amounts of protein in the urine is often seen as a first sign which may require further investigation by your GP. Protein in the urine can also be a sign of dehydration, or in some cases, a tumour in the bladder.
Like protein, glucose will not normally be found in healthy urine as healthy kidneys should be able to reabsorb filtered glucose back into your bloodstream. Glucose in the urine is known as Glycosuria and is almost always caused by high blood glucose levels, most commonly caused by untreated diabetes. In some cases, Glycosuria can be due to a problem with glucose reabsorption within the kidneys. Glycosuria can also indicate pregnancy.
Ketones are a substance not normally found in the urine, as their presence indicates your body is producing energy by burning fat instead of glucose. This usually happens if your cells aren’t getting enough glucose. If you are diabetic, high ketone levels in your urine could indicate that your body isn’t getting enough insulin and you should arrange to see your GP. Urine may also contain ketones in non-diabetics who are on a low-carbohydrate diet, partake in extreme exercise, are pregnant, or have an eating disorder.
Healthy urine normally contains some urobilinogen. But if there is little or no urobilinogen in your urine, it may indicate that your liver isn't working as it should. Similarly, too much urobilinogen in urine may indicate a liver disease such as hepatitis or cirrhosis.
A high white blood cell count in urine may indicate a urinary tract infection (UTI), such as cystitis (a bladder infection) or pyelonephritis (a kidney infection). UTIs can often be treated with antibiotics, so if your white blood cell count is high you may wish to see your GP, especially in the presence of symptoms such as difficulty urinating.
A high volume of red blood cells in urine may indicate infection, trauma, tumours or kidney stones. Red blood cells in urine can also be a result of kidney inflammation (glomerulonephritis).
Urinary casts are material (usually shed from kidney cell lining) which originate from the top of your urinary tract. High levels of casts in urine can suggest inflammation (Pyelonephritis), injury or poor blood flow to the kidneys.
It’s normal to find a few epithelial cells in urine as they are naturally shed by your bladder and urethra. High levels of epithelial cells may indicate a yeast or urinary tract infection, kidney or liver disease, and can even suggest certain types of cancer. If your levels are very high, you may wish to consult your GP for further investigation.
Crystals in urine are formed by the various chemicals in your urine. Although it is normal to have some small crystals in your urine, larger crystals can develop into kidney stones. Kidney stones rarely cause serious damage, but as they vary in size they can be extremely painful.
As urine is sterile, healthy urine should contain very few organisms. The presence of organisms in urine may be due to bacteria entering the urinary tract and moving up to the bladder, suggesting a urinary tract infection which may require further treatment by your GP.
Trichomonads are parasites that are not normally present in large volumes in healthy urine. High levels of trichomonads in your urine could indicate an infection.

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Male Cancer Risk (Over 40s) – £249

37 Blood Readings | 1 Clinician Check | 2 Sample tests | GP Consultation | 24/7 GP Helpline

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Female Cancer Risk (Over 40s) – £269

37 Blood Readings | 1 Clinician Check | 3 Sample tests | GP Consultation | 24/7 GP Helpline

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